Rare Conjoined Twins Have Been Separated At A London Hospital In A Series Of Operations Taking A Total Of 55 Hours

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Rare conjoined twins have been separated at a London hospital in a series of operations taking a total of 55 hours.
Two-year-old sisters Safa and Marwa Ullah had three major operations to separate their heads at Great Ormond Street.
More than 100 members of staff were involved in the procedures, which were carried out over a span of four months.
Surgeons separated their brains, intertwined in their shared skull, repositioned them and then cut the head apart.

They then reconstructed their skulls - sharing shards of bone between the two girls to make it stretch over the top of their new heads.
Two-year-old sisters Safa and Marwa Ullah had three major operations to separate their heads at Great Ormond Street
Step by step how the 100 staff divided the girls. Craniopagus twins - the term for twins joined at the head - are extremely rare
Safa and Marwa Ullah, born craniopagus twins, have finally been separated after 50 hours of surgery at Great Ormond Street Hospital.

They were discharged in July. Pictured with their mother Zainab Bibi and grandfather Mohammed Sadat
The girls, from northern Pakistan, had their final operation in February. They are now recovering in London and plan to return to their homeland in 2020.
The operation was paid for http://af5188.com/home.php?mod=space&uid=124386&do=profile by Pakistani businessman Murtaza Lakhani.
The girls' mother, Zainab Bibi, 34, said: ‘We are indebted to the hospital and to the staff and we would like to thank them for everything they have done. 
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'With God's grace I am able to hold one for an hour and then the other one. God has answered our prayers.' 
The girls, whose father has died, were discharged from hospital on July 1 and are recovering in London with their mother, grandfather Mohammad Sadat, 57, and an uncle.
Craniopagus twins - the term for twins joined at the head - are extremely rare.There is one set in every 2.5million births, and most do not survive more than a day.

Each case is unique, and separations have only been reported about 60 times since the first attempt in 1952.
The separation took tedious planning by a team of experts including scientists and engineers using advanced technology such as virtual reality to practice because it was such a high-risk operation. Pictured in hospital after starting their surgery in October 2018
The team at Great Ormond Street, led by neurosurgeon Noor ul Owase Jeelani and plastic surgeon Professor David Dunaway, planning the procedure
Safa and Marwa Ullah were born craniopagus twins. Their skulls and blood vessels were fused together (pictured) needing three operations 
The surgery was paid for by a private donor.

Mother Zainab Bibi, 34, said the family is 'extremely excited about the future'. Pictured, the girls recovering at Gosh after separation 
The team at Great Ormond Street, led by neurosurgeon Noor ul Owase Jeelani and plastic surgeon Professor David Dunaway, have performed the procedure twice before, in 2006 and 2011.
<div class="art-ins mol-factbox floatRHS health" data-version="2" id="mol-1825cab0-a746-11e9-9b7d-d72c04bc709d" website conjoined twins finally been separated after 50 hours of surgery